Eating Yummy Healthy

Yummy 100-calorie snack: Yellow-tail Tuna and miso soup. From Womenshealthmag.com

We all want to eat healthy, but we also know that hunger and snacking seem to be something of a way of life here in the good ol’ USA. What’s a body to do? Welllll….. why not ask a dietician?

Lisa Drayer, R.D. had a recent article on Woman’s Health Magazine’s web site, sharing 28 100-calorie snacks. You should go see the article, here, because the photos of the items are awesome. (The picture at the start of this column is one of them.) The list shows that you can eat sensibly, get good taste, and overcome the nibbles.  Here is the list:

  1. Sliced Tomato with a sprinkle of Feta and Olive Oil
  2. Vitamuffin VitaTop
  3. Starbucks Tall Skinny Latte
  4. Banana
  5. 1/2 c edamame (measured shelled)
  6. 3 c Air-Popped Popcorn
  7. Quaker Instant Oatmeal (regular flavor)
  8. Yoplait Light Yogurt (fruit flavors)
  9. 8 Shrimp and 4 Tbsp Cocktail Sauce
  10. 2 Sargento Light String Cheese Snacks
  11. Curves Granola Bar
  12. 1 c Baby Carrots with 2 Tbsp Hummus
  13. 1 1/4 oz Turkey Jerky
  14. 1/2 Cantaloupe
  15. 1 c Vegetable Juice, such as V8, and 2 oz Oscar Mayer Oven-Roasted Turkey Breast
  16. 1 Tbsp Peanuts and 2 Tbsp Dried Cranberries
  17. 1 c Strawberries and 3 Tbsp Cool Whip Free
  18. 3 Amy’s Cheese Pizza Snacks
  19. 1 c Raspberries with 2 Tbsp Plain Yogurt and 1 tsp Honey
  20. 2 Egg Whites with 1 Slice Whole Wheat Toast
  21. About 1/2 c Frozen Yogurt
  22. 5 Hershey’s Special Dark Chocolate Kisses
  23. 2/3 c Barbara’s Bakery Cinnamon Puffins Cereal (dry)
  24. 1 oz Yellowtail and 1 oz Tuna Sashimi with 1 packet Kikkoman Instant Tofu Miso Soup
  25. 18 Fat Free Rold Gold Tiny Twists
  26. 2 oz Veggie Land Veg-T-Balls with 2 Tbsp Muir Glen Chunky Tomato Sauce
  27. Chocolate Milk (1 c nonfat milk + 1 Tbsp Hershey’s Lite Chocolate Syrup)
  28. 1 Nutter Butter Granola Bar

One thing I love about this list is that it has it all — protein, carbs, fiber… even chocolate milk. Yes, if you love your Starbucks, there is a way to have it on a 100 calorie limit. (OK, if you cannot abide the taste of non-fat milk, you probably won’t go for that one.)

The real point is that if you take a few minutes and think or research things, you can put yourself into a position to win. If you don’t, you’ll probably go for the 200 calorie Krispy Kreme glazed donut  (but who can eat just one of those, especially when they are hot off the line!). Seriously, What makes all of these list items great is that they can satisfy a craving your body might be having without going overboard, and that is what it really is all about.

Do you have a go-to low calorie snack you enjoy? Why not share it in the Comments section below?

Top 28 Best Healthy Snacks by Lisa Drayer, R.D. at Women’s Health Magazine’s website

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Own Your Life Through Your Rituals

I have been reading a lot lately about the power of daily routines: morning routines, bedtime routines, etc. This seems to be a popular topic in the leadership and wellness literature lately. In this article by Alan Henry at Lifehacker.com, I saw not only a great method for helping you to create one, but Alan goes into why you ought to have little rituals… habits that control your day.

Why have rituals? First, they help you de-stress. I am sure that stress creeps into your life from time to time. If you don’t have positive ways of dealing with it, you will adopt negative ways. And that leads to the second reason to adopt rituals: having positive ways of dealing with stress leaves less room for negative ways to creep in. As the Og Mandino said in The Greatest Salesman in the World, “If I must be a slave to my habits, I will form good habits and become their slave.”

Alan shares a three-step process for creating a ritual-habit for dealing stress:

  1. Track your mood and identify your stress points. Find out what causes your stress by keeping a log or journal about your mood. Try to pinpoint what causes the stresses in your life. Are there common themes?
  2. Define your “Interventions,” or rituals you want to pick up. What can you do to take a break from the stress? Something that can be done almost anywhere, so that you can deal with stress even if you aren’t in a familiar environment? As you find these things that can help you deal with the stress, figure ways to automatically trigger the response when the stress goes off. Psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson, PhD calls these “if-then” plans. Planting them into your mind will create triggers to help you when the stress begins.
  3. Make it a habit. Now take your budding rituals and make them part of your routine, using them even when you don’t have stress. When you can call your calming ritual to mind even when you are not stressed, soon the stress will have less power over you because you have developed a means of being calm even before the trouble hits. This detachment leads to emotional stability.

One other reason to create rituals is that they can keep you in touch with the things you value most. How many of us get caught up in the day-to-day and lose sight of the things we value? Stopping and taking a little time out, whether for self-care or self-study or anything else you value ensures that you will live your value… and become a slave to them…

What rituals have you developed for yourself? Why not share them in the comments section below?

How Personal Rituals Can Improve Your Health (and How to Build Them) by Alan Henry at Lifehacker.com